2019 PoemTown Events

Local artist Jan Fowler
Kerrin McCadden

Monday, April 1st 6:00 – 8:00 PM:
Dinner with a Poet  –  Join poet Kerrin McCadden for dinner at the Black Krim Tavern in Randolph VT. Dinner at 6:00pm, followed by her reading at 7:00pm. Call (802) 728-6776 to make dinner reservations.

Saturday, April 6th 4 – 6 PM:
Reading at the White River Craft Center with Adeena Karasick and Maria Damon from Brooklyn NY, Mark Lamoureux from New Haven CT and local writer Joan Feierabend

Wednesday, April 10 7 PM:
Three local Vermont poets read their work at Kimball Public Library in Randolph VT: Corey Cook, Anne Shivas, Carol Potter

Saturday, April 13th 4 – 6 PM:
Reading at the White River Craft Center with Gina Myers from Philadelphia and local writer Josie Carothers

Wednesday, April 17 7 PM:
Poetry Open Mic at Kimball Public Library in Randolph
Bring two or three of your poems and sign up at the door.
Light refreshments.

Saturday, April 20 7 PM:
Farmer Poets Night Three farmer poets read at the Silloway Sugar House, 1303 Boudro Rd, Randolph Center VT
Taylor Katz, Carl Russell, and Caitlin Gildrien
Sugar on snow and other light refreshments

Thursday, April 25 7 PM:
Poem Town Grand Finale: Los Lorcas — In the spirit of Federico Garcia Lorca — poets Partridge Boswell and Peter Money, along with guitarist Nat Williams, will fuse poetry and music in a passionate and surprising mash-up! Esther Mesh Room, Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph

Saturday, April 27th 4 – 6 PM:
Reading at the White River Craft Center with Jenny Grassl and Julie Thacker from Cambridge MA and local writer Gloria Smith

For questions or more information, ask Janet Wattonmusbird@gmail.com

2019 Poem Locations

Local artist Jan Fowler

River Walk
Trish Alley — Songbird Dreams
Blair Brooks — That Tuft
Corinne Davis — The Heist
Michael Farrand — Sticking to Vermont
William Graham — A Quiet Place
Brook Herter James — At the Edge
Wilma Ann Johnson — persistent tapping
Jonathan Root — Blink
Shannon Trigos — Pockets of Heaven to Be Glimpsed

Randolph Village Laundromat75 North Main Street
Genevieve Bronk — The Aloe Plant in the Doctor’s Office
Gus Speth — What He Could Have Done

Chandler Music Hall 71-73 North Main Street
Hatsy McGraw — Best Dancer
Janet Watton — The Harp Player

Kimball Public Library67 North Main Street
Bonnie Beck — For Mary Oliver
Yvonne Daly — The Most Detailed Map
Rebecca McMeekin — Middle School Science
Andrea Rogers — Lament
Christina Strong — Meditations on Resolutions

Randolph House65 North Main Street
Bonnie Beck — My Dad’s Handkerchief
Nancy Vandenburgh — Step Out

Super Suds Laundromat10 Pleasant Street
Peter Dregallo — Filling Voids
Becky Farmer — Quandary
Wilma Ann Johnson — Oh, what a morning!

Green Light Café22 Pleasant Street
Steve Augustus — Growing Older
Brook Herter James — Every Morning Now
Michelle Holder — Maybe We’re All Saints
Geza Tatrallyay — I often wonder when I see …

Trillium24 Pleasant Street
Anne Bower — For my Tai Chi colleagues
Cynthia Liepmann — Half Mast

The Herald30 Pleasant Street
Anne Bakeman — Dryocopus pileatus
Judy Crocker — Grammar Lessons
Dick Drysdale — Mahatma

Vermont Computing 23 Merchants Row
Carl Garguilo — Digital Deletes
Hatsy McGraw — Imbolc

The Black Krim Tavern 21 Merchants Row
Melanie Adams — A Hard Day

Sidewalk Florist19 Merchants Row
Yvonne Daly — Spring Vigil
Michelle Holder — February

The Red Door20 Merchants Row
Genevieve Bronk — Lavender
Tom Martin — coincidence

Flats Tatooing of Vermont18 Merchants Row
Brook Herter James — Route 90 Westbound

Fisher Auto Parts10 Merchants Row
Melanie Adams — Rusty Nail
Roderick Bates — After the Rapture
Audrey Boerum — The Iron Cat
Anne Bower — November storm
Judy Crocker — Japanese Beetles
George Murphy — Days
George Murphy — Blood
George Murphy — Past
Jack Rossi — Letting Go
Heather Steliga — Tribute to a Victorious Vermonter

One Main Tap & Grill2 Merchants Row
Laura Foley — Flowers in a Ball Jar
Debby Franzoni — At the Downtown Diner
Gina Logan — The Haitian Workers in the Thruway Cafeteria
Janet Watton — Spring

Bar Harbor Bank & Trust 21 North Main Street
Steve Augustus — Catch Her Breath
Jeff Bernstein — My Scientific Submission Process
Rebecca McMeekin — Saltwater Farm, September
Judy Crocker — The Morning I Chose Not to Listen to NPR
Nancy Hewitt — Morning After First Frost
George Longenecker — Summer Lingered
Jack Mayer — God Particle
Janet Watton — Perfection

Ken’s Barbershop33 North Main Street
Gina Logan — The Tracks in this Morning’s Snow

The Frankenburg Agency35 North Main Street
Deb Chadwick — Peaceful

Bethany Church Office29 North Main Street
James Barrett — Rachel
Lindy Sayward — Saving Earth
Jim Schley — Dumbstruck

DuBois & King28 North Main Street
Bonnie Beck — Rolling Rock
Jack Mayer — In Memoriam — SVEA Camp Stove
Verandah Porche — These Are Just to Say
Marshall Witten — Late April

Blue Moon6 North Main Street
Ina Anderson — My Mother’s Purse
Nancy Hewitt — Chanel No. 5

Northfield Savings Bank2 North Main Street
Peter Fernandez — Detoxification Unit 17, B-Wing
Debby Franzoni — And It Was Her Favorite
Nancy Hewitt — Lesion
Verandah Porche — True Haiku: 01.02
Shannon Trigos — When You Go Away

East Garden – 3 Salisbury Street
Pamela Ahlen — At the Botanic Garden in Claremont, CA

Wilson Tire – 5 Salisbury Street
Tom Martin — Nervous

Randolph Municipal Building7 Summer Street
Genevieve Bronk — The Coach
Doreen Guillette — Wisdom of a Maple Tree
Janet Hayward Burnham — Over the Top
Sandra Maccarrone — February

Randolph Coal & Oil8 Salisbury Street
Jack Mayer — BLOOD — House-call on the Canadian border
Verandah Porche — So Long, L. Cohen

Randolph Police Station6 Salisbury Street
Roderick Bates — The Art of the Relationship

Bob’s M&M Beverage4 Salisbury Street
Carl Garguilo — To Each

Chef’s Market 2 Salisbury Street
Jeff Bernstein — Winter Market
Elissa Doering — Before the Neighborhood Wakes
Judith Hishikawa — Strawberry Moments
Rebecca McMeekin — Catching the Light

StagecoachDepot Square
Yvonne Daly — Travelling

NAPA / Randolph Auto Supply3 South Main Street
Pamela Ahlen — You take the Moto Guzzi for a ride
Roderick Bates — Coldest Thanksgiving on Record
Ann Cooper — Driving North
Tim Eberhardt — My Father Always Said
Jenny Rossi — The War is Never Over

Heritage Real Estate 10 South Main Street
Steven Yaskell — The Dog Mountains

The Playhouse11 South Main Street
Jeff Bernstein — Popping Corn on the Interstate

Beacon Printing 18 South Main Street
Anne Bergeron — For My Father
Audrey Boerum — A Poet Is ….

Curves – 12½ South Main Street
Barbara Stearns — 90+

Al’s Pizza12 South Main Street
Lukina Andreyev — And I Lost Me
Audrey Boerum — I Declare My Coronation
Carl Garguilo — Angels
Shannon Trigos — Warm Innocence

Former Verizon Buildingcorner of Main Street and Merchants Row
Anne Bower —- Mt. Ascutney
Ann Cooper — Man’s Fate
Tim Eberhardt — A Hospital Death
Emerson Gale — Winter Garden
Michelle Holder — Pit Stop Near the Boofy Quimby Memorial Center
Cynthia Liepmann — Time
Julie Longstreth — Osteo-dendrochronology

Randolph Regional Veterinary Hospital86 Dylan Drive
Debby Franzoni — Snapshot
Jack Rossi — Luna (Please Leave The Cat Downstairs Tonight, Dear)
Susan Shea — Missing Marmalade
Bonnie Watters — Silvio Loves His Stones

2019 Poets Bios

Local artist Jan Fowler

Josie Carothers has always lived in a world of words. Life is so fascinating, what better way to live it than to describe it? Leaving behind a life of environmental jobs, activism and advocacy, and the raising of pigs, chickens and children, she is now what she calls a “post-professional,” living with her mate and writing, gardening and dwelling in Vermont, all for her own pleasure. She mines the life of a revolutionary in the 60’s, a free-thinker in the 70’s and beyond, and the inheritor of vast and deep family stories for her material.

Caitlin Gildrien is a writer, graphic designer, and erstwhile farmer living at the feet of the Green Mountains. Her work has recently appeared in Rattle, the Hopper, the Rumpus, Intima, Rise Up Review, and Poets Reading the News. Find her at www.cattailcreative.com and @cattail_caitlin. 

Corey D. Cook’s fifth collection of poems, The Weight of Shadows, was released in January (2019) by Finishing Line Press. His poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in the Aurorean, Bloodroot Literary Magazine, Brevities, Chiron Review, Freshwater, and Northern New England Review. Corey edits Red Eft Review and lives in Thetford Center, Vermont. 

Maria Damon teaches in the Writing Department and in the Department of Humanities and Media Studies at the Pratt Institute of Art. She is the author of several books of poetry scholarship and co-author of several books of poetry.

Joan Feierabend: I am a visual artist who likes to write fiction to try and fathom facts. I live in East Randolph and have written for as long as I can remember.

Jenny Grassl was raised in Pennsylvania, and now lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her poems appeared most recently in the Boston Review annual poetry contest, runner-up prize selected by Mary Jo Bang, also in the anthology: Humanagerie, Eibonvale Press, UK, Ocean State Review, Rogue Agent and Phantom Drift. Her poems are forthcoming in: Rhino Poetry, Radar Poetry, and Massachusetts Review.

Adeena Karasick is a New York based Canadian poet, performer, cultural theorist and media artist and the author of ten books of poetry and poetics. Her Kabbalistically inflected, urban, Jewish feminist mashups have been described as “electricity in language” (Nicole Brossard), “proto-ecstatic jet-propulsive word torsion” (George Quasha), noted for their “cross-fertilization of punning and knowing, theatre and theory” (Charles Bernstein) “a twined virtuosity of mind and ear which leaves the reader deliciously lost in Karasick’s signature ‘syllabic labyrinth’” (Craig Dworkin); “one long dithyramb of desire, a seven-veiled dance of seduction that celebrates the tangles, convolutions, and ecstacies of unbridled sexuality… demonstrating how desire flows through language, an unstoppable flood of allusion (both literary and pop-cultural), word-play, and extravagant and outrageous sound-work.” (Mark Scroggins). Most recently is Checking In (Talonbooks, 2018) and Salomé: Woman of Valor (University of Padova Press, Italy, 2017), the libretto for her Spoken Word opera co-created with Grammy award winning composer, Sir Frank London. She teaches Literature and Critical Theory for the Humanities and Media Studies Dept. at Pratt Institute, is Poetry Editor for Explorations in Media Ecology, 2018 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Award recipient and winner of the 2016 Voce Donna Italia award for her contributions to feminist thinking and 2018 winner of the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. The “Adeena Karasick Archive” is established at Special Collections, Simon Fraser University.

Taylor Mardis Katz is a poet, farmer, and freelancer from Chelsea, VT. With her husband, she runs Free Verse Farm & Apothecary, an herb farm specializing in growing ingredients for their ever-expanding line of herbal tea blends, culinary blends, and herbal remedies and body care products, which are available locally as well as online. Taylor also works as a poet for hire, writing poems for both businesses and individuals.

Mark Lamoureux is an Assistant Professor at Housatonic Community College. He is the author of four full-length collections of poems, It’ll Never Be Over for Me (Black Radish Books, 2016) 29 Cheeseburgers + 39 Years (Pressed Wafer, 2013), Spectre (Black Radish Books, 2010) and Astrometry Organon (BlazeVox, 2008). A fifth book, Horologion, is forthcoming from Poet Republik, Ltd. in 2019. His work has most recently appeared in Fence, Dream Pop and Fourteen Hills. In 2014 he won the 2nd Annual Ping Pong Poetry prize for his poem “Winterhenge/Summerhenge,” selected by David Shapiro.

Gina Myers is the author of two full-length poetry collections, A Model Year (2009) and Hold It Down (2013), as well as several chapbooks, including most recently Philadelphia (Barrelhouse, 2017). In addition to poetry, she has published numerous essays, reviews, and articles for a variety of publications, including Hyperallergic, Frontier Psychiatrist, Fanzine, The Rumpus, and The Poetry Project Newsletter, among other places. Originally from Saginaw, MI, she now lives in Philadelphia, PA, where she works as a web content writer and social media specialist, co-edits the tiny with Gabriella Torres, and runs the Accidental Player reading series. Learn more at gina-myers.org.

Carol Potter is the 2014 winner of the Field Poetry Prize from Oberlin College Press for her fifth book of poems, Some Slow Bees.  Other awards include the 1998 Cleveland State Poetry Center award for her book, The Short History of Pets, and the Balcones award as well as a Pushcart Award and residencies at Yaddo, MacDowell, The Fundacion Valparaiso and Millay Colony of the Arts. Publications include poems in The American Poetry ReviewPoetryThe Green Mountains ReviewHotel Amerika, Sinister WisdomThe Kenyon ReviewHayden’s Ferry, The Massachusetts Review,  The Los Angeles ReviewPoet Lore,  River Styx and the anthology of contemporary Vermont poetry, Roads Taken

Kerrin McCadden

Kerrin McCadden is the author of Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes, winner of the Vermont Book Award and the New Issues Poetry Prize. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, a Vermont Studio Center Fellowship, and the Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award. Poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Best American Poetry, The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, American Poetry ReviewBeloit Poetry JournalPloughshares, Prairie Schooner, and Rattle. She is associate director of the Conference on Poetry and Teaching at The Frost Place and teaches at Montpelier High School. She lives in South Burlington, Vermont.

Carl B. Russell and his wife Lisa McCrory own and operate Earthwise Farm & Forest in Bethel, VT, where they raise organic vegetables and grass fed livestock, use draft animals for logging and field work, and offer workshops on skills for sustainable livelihoods. Carl has operated Russell Forestry Services since 1986, specializing in ecological forestry and low-impact timber harvest with draft animals. Carl’s work with horses and oxen, and other land-based enterprises, provides a broad foundation for personal creativity. From time to time it moves him to share his observations through little bits of written imagery. 

Anne Shivas grew up in Scotland. She worked there as a teacher, then did graduate studies in philosophy of education, aesthetics, and dance in London. She has an MFA in poetry from Drew University, where she has been a guest-lecturer. She teaches the Alexander Technique and leads Osher classes in Scottish poetry and literature. Her poems have been published in the USA, Scotland, Israel and New Zealand. Her first poetry collection, Whit Grace, was published in 2017. Her poem “An Old Woman Cooking Eggs” was chosen as one of the 20 Best Scottish Poems of 2017. She lives in Norwich, VT.

Gloria Smith: I am a born and raised Vermonter, recently retired nurse, as well as an artist and writer. I live in Braintree, Vermont. I have written for my own amusement and pleasure for years, now I am sharing my writing with others, be it good or bad. I prefer nonfiction, life is just too amazing to make this stuff up.

Twice a fellow at The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Julia Thacker has also held fellowships from The Bunting Institute at Radcliffe and The National Endowment for the Arts. Her poems and stories have appeared in AGNI, The Boston Globe Magazine, Little Star, The Missouri Review Online, New Directions and others. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

2019 Call for Submissions

PoemTown Randolph organizers invite Vermont poets of all ages to submit their original poems as the centerpiece of its 6th annual celebration during National Poetry Month. Throughout the month of April, posters of selected poems will be displayed in the main windows and doors of businesses, churches, and organizations in Randolph.

Poets are welcome to submit up to three original poems for consideration, no longer than 24 lines each. Please send 1-3 original poems as MS Word attachments to musbird@gmail.com. In the text of an email, include your contact information (name, mailing address, email address and telephone number). Then attach each poem separately with the title of the poem as the document name and no identifying information other than the poem’s title on each document. The submission deadline is February 4.

Please do not submit any work that has been previously displayed in any PoemTown or PoemCity celebrations, nor any poems that have previously appeared in print anywhere else.

By sending work to PoemTown 2019, poets agree that PoemTown may use any poem in display, in promotional materials, and in associated online, print and other media. Poets will, of course, be credited for their work in all places their poems appear.

In addition to displayed poems, PoemTown organizers are planning special poetry events throughout April, including dinner with poet Kerrin McCadden at the Black Krim, an open mic night, Saturday afternoons at the White River Craft Center with local and out of town guests, an evening featuring local published poets, a night of “farmers’ poetry” at Silloways’ Sugarhouse, and a special event with Los Lorcas at Chandler. Details will be posted soon!

2018 Poets

Ina Anderson grew up in Cumbria, England. She has now lived in Sharon, Vermont, for many years. Her poems have appeared in several publications, including the anthology Perhaps It Was the Pie. Her first poetry collection, Journey Into Space, was published by Antrim House in 2017. She runs a poetry radio show, Wordstream, on Royalton Community Radio, and leads poetry workshops at Seven Stars Arts Center in Sharon.

Danny Dover’s poems have appeared in various journals including Oberon, Himalayan Journal, Blueline, and Bloodroot. He was a 2013 Pushcart nominee.  Danny’s first full-length book of poetry, Tasting Precious Metal (Antrim House Books), was published in 2014 and a chapbook, Kindness Soup, Thankful Tea, came out in 2006. Danny is a retired Dartmouth College piano technician. Suspecting that his social studies teacher never read term papers, Danny once handed in the same paper twice and received a higher grade the second time.

Didi Jackson — Didi Jackson’s poems have appeared in The New YorkerPloughshares, The Common, and Water~Stone Review among other publications. Her manuscript, Almost Animal, (now Killing Jar) was a finalist for the Alice James Book Award, the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize by Persea Books, and the Autumn House Press first book award. Didi’s first collection of poems, Killing Jar,is forthcoming from Red Hen Press.  Her chapbook, Slag and Fortune, was published by Floating Wolf Quarterly (2013).  Currently, she teaches Poetry and the Visual Arts, 20th c. Poetry of War and Witness, and Creative Writing at the University of Vermont and serves as the poetry editor for Green Mountains Review. 

Photo by Erin Patrice O’Brien

Major Jackson is the author of four collections of poetry including Roll Deep which won the 2016 Vermont Book Award. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, among other honors. He is the University Distinguished Professor at the University of Vermont and serves as Poetry Editor of The Harvard Review.

Taylor Mardis Katz is a poet and a poet for hire. Her poems have appeared in print and online journals, on the radio, and in various other ephemera. Armed with a MFA in Creative Writing from San Diego State University, she writes poems for herself and others from the comfort of her own Chelsea, VT homestead, as well as at local hootenannies. With her husband, she runs Free Verse Farm & Apothecary, a small herb farm specializing in farm-grown herbal products.

 

Geza Tatrallyay — Born in Budapest, Geza escaped with his family in 1956 during the Hungarian Revolution, immigrating to Canada. He graduated with a BA from Harvard in 1972, and, as a Rhodes Scholar, obtained a BA/MA from Oxford in 1974, completing his studies with a MSc from London School of Economics in 1975. Geza’s professional experience has included stints in government, international finance and environmental entrepreneurship. He is the author of several thrillers and memoirs, as well as two published collections of poetry (CELLO’S TEARS and SIGHS AND MURMURS) and is currently working on a third (EXTINCTION). He currently divides his time between Vermont and San Francisco.

 

Peggy Rose Whiteneck has been writing poetry for most of her life. Over the years, her work has appeared in a few national journals that are dedicated to disciplines ranging from the literary arts to theology. She is the author of the poetry collection From These Earthly Parts (Old Line Publishing/Maple Creek Media, 2010).

2017 Poem Locations

Randolph Village Laundromat – 75 North Main Street
Janet E. Green – The Laundromat
Jamie K. Connor – Linda’s Daughter

Chandler Music Hall – 71-73 North Main Street
Becky McMeekin – Elegy for 100 Pianos
Jacob Louis d’Antonio – Vermont Has Talent

Kimball Public Library – 67 North Main Street
Nancy Hewitt – No Words, Plenty of Language
Michelle Holder – In October, Grandmother

Randolph House – 65 North Main Street
Jeanne Ward – Mr. Charles Comfort
Marshall Chase – Randolph Center School, 1962

Super Suds Laundromat – 10 Pleasant Street
Janet E. Green – God in unsuspected places
Dak Gustal – Flying Off
Anne Bower – Holding Pattern

Three Bean Café – 22 Pleasant Street
Andrea Rogers – Making Soup
Laura Foley – The Wrangler
Susan Delattre – Morning on the Deck

The Herald – 30 Pleasant Street
Julie Cadwallader Staub – Two Poets
Victoria Crain – Darklings
Stephen Morris – The Precision of Language

First Light Studios – 34 Pleasant Street
Janet Watton – Heedless

Vermont Computing Cooperative – 23 Merchants Row
Geza Tatrallyay – For a Squashed Land Crab

The Black Krim Tavern – 21 Merchants Row
Thomas Martin – Gram’s

Sidewalk Florist – 19 Merchants Row
Lindy Sayward – Tangible Hope
Anne Bower – Patio Performance

Fenix Fine Foods – 20 Merchants Row
Kathryn Dodge – Nourishment
Peggy Rose Whiteneck – Alternate Universes

Flats Tatooing of Vermont – 18 Merchants Row
Chloe Viner – Thelma

Fisher Auto Parts – 10 Merchants Row
Gary Margolis – It’s January and feels like November
Steve Dushan – Megus
Barbara Stearns – The Invitation
Wilma Ann Johnson – The Unexpected
Elisha Joy West – Haven

One Main Tap & Grill – 2 Merchants Row
Becky McMeekin – Watching the Olympics
Ina Anderson – Big Dipper
Anne Bakeman – Hermit Thrush
Carolyn Sobel – Friends

Clara Martin Center – 11 North Main Street
Becky McMeekin – Girl with a Blue-Rimmed Bowl
Gina Logan – Alexander

Belmains – 14 North Main Street
Bonnie Beck – Valentine
Carolyn Sobel – Aura
Jack Mayer – I Am a God to the Birds
Genevieve Bronk – Life
Cynthia Liepmann – Keys
Julie Cadwallader Staub – Staple
Anne Bakeman – Darn Tough
Gary Margolis – Love Beyond Us and the Falling

Lake Sunapee Bank – 21 North Main Street
Nancy Hewitt – Calm Before Sandy
Wilma Ann Johnson – Au Printemps
George Murphy – Travelers
Audrey J. Boerum – The Wind …
Charleigh – Newfoundland
Geza Tatrallyay – Mo(u)rning
Julie Longstreth – Black and White
Gary Margolis – In the Laboratory

Ken’s Barbershop – 33 North Main Street
Gina Logan – Wild Turkeys Mating

Holiday Beauty Salon – 33 North Main Street
Roger Dodge – Monday Was A Holiday

The Frankenburg Agency – 35 North Main Street
Jon Kaplan – A Visit with Dad

Bethany Church Office – 29 North Main Street
Jack Mayer – Singing Over
Andrea Rogers – Wedding Dance
Joyce Borthwick-Leslie – On This Summer Morning I Lie on a Hillside and Think of God

DuBois & King – 28 North Main Street
Joyce Borthwick-Leslie – His Legacy
Judy Crocker – Beyond Lascaux

Station Break – 26 North Main Street
Carolyn Sobel – Writer

Blue Moon – 6 North Main Street
Chloe Viner – Heritage
Verandah Porche – 01.05.17: feels like 10
Kira Delhagen – La Finca Hermedad
Johnathan Coulter – Nature’s Loom
Janet Watton – Our Autumn Blaze

Northfield Savings Bank – 2 North Main Street
Judy Crocker – Break
Michelle Holder – On Display
Victoria Crain – Time Wrap
David Stauffer – A Summer Sonnet
Barbara Stearns – To Know Or Not To Know

East Garden – 3 Salisbury Street
Bonnie Fallon – The Sun Rises in the East

Wilson Tire – 5 Salisbury Street
Michelle Holder – After the Winter Blues

Randolph Municipal Building – 7 Summer Street
Debby Franzoni – Election Time
Don Payton – The Pendulum Always Swings
Joan Mathews – Ask the Mothers
Phyllis Davis – A Childhood Memory

Randolph Coal & Oil – 8 Salisbury Street
Peggy Rose Whiteneck – Climate Change
Victoria Crain – Anthropocene Era

Randolph Police Station – 6 Salisbury Street
Bonnie Beck – Bear

Bob’s M&M Beverage – 4 Salisbury Street
Verandah Porche – Little Winter: April Fools

Stagecoach – Depot Square
Lukina Andreyev – Traveling

Randolph Village Pizza – 1 South Main Street
Carl Garguilo – Liquid Grace

NAPA / Randolph Auto Supply – 3 South Main Street
Megan Buchanan – Pickup
Gina Logan – Wood
Sharon Moulton – Covered Roads
Peggy Brightman – Primavera Comes
Pamela Ahlen – Playing with Elves at Midnight

The Playhouse – 11 South Main Street
Geza Tatrallyay – Ember eyes

Beacon Printing – 18 South Main Street
Pamela Ahlen – Wayside Tree
Corinne Davis – The Dance

Curves – 12½ South Main Street
Carl Garguilo – The Gravity of Living

Century 21 –  12½ South Main Street
Janet Hayward Burnham – 1781

Al’s Pizza – 12 South Main Street
Elaine Pauley – First Poem
Elissa Doering – To Journey to Raccoon Cove
Elizabeth Mariani – When You’re on The List
Susan Delattre – At Lake Champlain

Former Verizon Building
corner of Main Street and Merchants Row
Laura Foley – Twice the Speed of Sound
Verandah Porche – Eve After
Alden Blodgett – Images and Instinct
Pamela Ahlen – Wild Oats
Margo Marrone – Seeing with New Eyes

Randolph Regional Veterinary Hospital – 86 Dylan Drive
Debby Franzoni – Tonight at the Lake House
Cynthia Liepmann – Dog
Laura Foley – When I Went Out This Morning

Central Supplies – 839 VT Route 12
Judy Crocker – House Key

Chef’s Market – 839 VT Route 12
Julie Cadwallader Staub – Ode to Salted Caramels

2017 Participating Poet Bios

Ina Anderson grew up in Cumbria, in the north of England. She worked as a technical editor for professional journals in London and in the U.S., including Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Science, with Carl Sagan. She then turned to teaching communication, writing, and literature, spending over 20 years at the Community College of Vermont as a faculty member and student advisor. Ina’s poems have appeared in several publications, including Mountain Troubadour, Red Fox Poets, and a recent anthology, Perhaps It Was the Pie. Her first poetry collection, Journey Into Space, was published in 2016. Ina has lived in Sharon, Vermont, for many years.

Megan BuchananMegan Buchanan – Megan Buchanan’s poems have appeared in such as journals as The Sun Magazine, make/shift, A Woman’s Thing, and multiple anthologies. Her first full-length collection, Clothesline Religion, is just out from Green Writers Press and is widely available. Born in California, Megan’s lived for long stretches in Ireland, the mountains of the southwest, and New England. Her work has been supported by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Vermont Arts Council, and the Vermont Studio Center. Megan is also a collaborative performer and dancemaker, a teacher, and an activist.  She currently lives in southern Vermont with her two children. meganbuchanan.net.

Chard deNiord – The VT Poet Laureate was born in New Haven, CT and raised in Lynchburg, VA. After graduating from Lynchburg College, deNiord earned his MDiv from Yale Divinity School. Before pursuing ordination, he worked as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the CT Mental Health Center. Five years later, he left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985.  Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1990, he published his first collection, Asleep in the Fire (University of Alabama Press), while teaching comparative religions and philosophy at the Putney School. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. In addition to several collections of poetry, he has authored a book of essays and interviews with renowned poets. He is currently a professor of English at Providence College. He lives in Westminster West with his wife, Liz.

Laura Foley won first place in the Common Goods Poetry Contest, judged by Garrison Keillor; the 2016 National Outermost Poetry Prize, judged by Marge Piercy; Harpur Palate’s Milton Kessler Memorial Poetry Award; and the Grand Prize for the Atlanta Review’s International Poetry Contest. She is the author of five poetry collections, her most recent being Night Ringing. The Glass Tree won the Foreword Book of the Year Award, Silver, and was a Finalist for the NH Writer’s Project, Outstanding Book of Poetry. Joy Street won the Bisexual-Writer’s Award. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals and magazines. Laura holds graduate degrees in English Literature from Columbia University. Trained in chaplaincy through the New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, she volunteers in hospitals and prisons, and is a certified Shri Yoga Instructor. She lives in Pomfret, with her partner Clara Giménez, and three big dogs.

Navah Fried – Navah Fried loves writing poems. She feels that creative writing it is the most meaningful way to communicate. Besides writing, Navah usually finds herself listening to music, playing guitar and singing, going for walks, and thinking. She hopes to be a published poet in the future, on the side of an unknown career. Navah has been studying creative writing at Montpelier High School for the past two years and is excited to go on to college to help make the world better. Her work has been featured in Montpelier’s PoemCity for the past two years, but this is her first public reading.

Nancy Hewitt‘s chapbook Heard was published in 2013 by Finishing Line Press.  Her poetry has appeared in Mid-American Review, Prism Review, Phoebe, The Comstock Review, Off the Coast and other journals.  Her awards include the Nancy Hargrove Editors’ Prize for Poetry from Jabberwock Review and a Pushcart Prize nomination.  She is a clinical social worker with a private psychotherapy practice in Salem, MA.  She is the first Poet Laureate of Swampscott, MA, and divides her time between Swampscott and East Randolph, VT.

Reuben Jackson – In a 2012 Seven Days story introducing the new host of Vermont Public Radio’s “Friday Night Jazz”,  retiring jazz-show host George Thomas said of Jackson, “He thinks like a poet.”. Reuben Jackson’s poetry reflects his love of jazz, and as regular VPR listeners know, his baritone voice is as compelling as the music he presents. The Goddard College grad is an accomplished critic who has written for the Washington City Paper and the Washington Post in his hometown of Washington, D.C., as well as for the magazines Jazziz, JazzTimes and All About Jazz. His reviews have been featured on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered.” Before joining VPR, Jackson served for 20 years as the curator of the Duke Ellington Collection at the Smithsonian Institution. Jackson’s poetic forte is haiku.

Madeleine KuninMadeleine Kunin – Madeleine May Kunin was the fourth woman to be elected Governor in the U.S. and the first woman to serve as Governor of Vermont. She was born in Zurich, Switzerland and immigrated to the U.S. with her mother and brother during World War II. She served as Deputy Secretary of Education and Ambassador to Switzerland in the Clinton Administration, and is the founder of the Institute for Sustainable Communities, a non-government organization which focuses on climate change and civic society. At present she is a Marsh Professor at the University of Vermont, a commentator on Vermont Public Radio, and a blogger on the Huffington Post. She is the author of The New Feminist Agenda, Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work and Family, selected as an Editor’s Choice by The New York Times. She is also the author of  Pearls, Politics and Power, how women can win and lead, Living a Political Life, and The Big Green Book. She is a fellow at the Academy of Arts and Sciences and a recipient of the Eleanor Roosevelt award. She is married to John W. Hennessey and the mother of four children and six grandchildren.

Sydney Lea is a poet, novelist, essayist, editor, and professor. He served as Vermont’s Poet Laureate from 2011-2015. Lea has received fellowships from the Rockefeller, Fulbright and Guggenheim Foundations, and has taught at Dartmouth, Yale, Wesleyan, Vermont and Middlebury Colleges, as well as at Franklin College in Switzerland and the Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest. His stories, poems, essays and criticism have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, The New York Times, Sports Illustrated and many other periodicals, as well as in more than fifty anthologies. He founded New England Review in 1977 and edited it until 1989. Lea has been described as “a man in the woods with his head full of books, and a man in books with his head full of woods.” His affection for story, moreover, an affection derived in no small measure from men and women elders in New England, colors his poetry, just as a relish for the musical properties of the word colors his prose. His lifelong passion for the natural world informs almost his every utterance.  He lives in Newbury, Vermont, and is active both in literacy efforts and in conservation.

Verandah PorcheVerandah Porche works as a poet-in-residence, performer and writing partner. Based in rural Vermont since 1968, she has published Sudden Eden (Verdant Books), The Body’s Symmetry (Harper and Row) and Glancing Off (See Through Books), and has pursued an alternative literary career, creating collaborative writing projects in nontraditional settings: literacy and crisis centers, hospitals, factories, nursing homes, senior centers, a 200 year-old Vermont tavern and an urban working class neighborhood. Broad Brook Anthology, a play for voices, honors the lives of elders in Guilford, Vermont.  Listening Out Loud documents her residency with Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT. Verandah initiated—and for almost 30 years taught—the poetry program at Vermont’s Governor’s Institute on the Arts. “Come Over,” is a cd of songs written with Patty Carpenter, performed by the Dysfunctional Family Jazz band. She has read her work on NPR stations, in the Vermont State House and at the John Simon Guggenheim Museum. The Vermont Arts Council presented her with its Award of Merit in 1998, and its first Ellen McCulloch-Lovell Award in Arts Education in 2015, and Marlboro College, an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in 2012. Verandah was featured in “Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie.” “Shedding Light on the Working Forest,” a collaboration with visual artist Kathleen Kolb is currently showing around New England.

Marjorie Ryerson is the author of numerous books, including an internationally award-winning photography book and several non-fiction books. She is a well-published poet and photo-journalist. A writing professor for many years, Marjorie has taught poetry for Middlebury College at its Bread Loaf writing campus since 1990. She holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Marjorie was the driving force behind Randolph’s first PoemTown celebration in 2014.

Geza Tatrallyay – Born in Budapest, Hungary, Geza escaped with his family in 1956 during the Hungarian Revolution, immigrating to Canada the same year. He grew up in Toronto, attending the University of Toronto Schools, and graduated from Harvard University with a BA in Human Ecology. Geza was selected as a Rhodes Scholar from Ontario, attending Oxford University and graduating with a BA / MA in Human Sciences; he completed his studies with a MSc in Economics from London School of Economics and Politics. Geza represented Canada as an épée fencer in the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. He is a prolific author of thrillers, memoirs, and poetry. Geza’s professional experience has included stints in government, international organizations, finance ,and environmental entrepreneurship. Since 2004, he has been managing a few investments and devoting himself to his family and his writing.

Diana WhitneyDiana Whitney – Diana Whitney’s first book, Wanting It (Harbor Mountain Press, 2014), became an indie bestseller and won the Rubery Book Award in poetry. She’s the poetry critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Glamour, Salon, Ms. Magazine, and many more. She has been awarded writing grants and fellowships from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Vermont Arts Endowment Fund, and the Vermont Studio Center, among others, and was the 2015 winner of the Women’s National Book Association poetry prize. A yoga teacher by trade, Diana runs a small studio attached to her farmhouse in Brattleboro, where she lives with her husband, two daughters, and three puzzling cats. She’s currently finishing a memoir about motherhood and sexuality. www.diana-whitney.com

Baron WormserBaron Wormser – Baron Wormser is the author/co-author of fourteen books and a poetry chapbook. His books include Scattered Chapters: New and Selected Poems (Sarabande Books), The Road Washes Out in Spring: a Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid (University Press of New England), and The Poetry Life: Ten Stories (CavanKerry Press). His novel Tom o’ Vietnam, about a Vietnam veteran who is obsessed with King Lear, will be published by New Rivers Press in the fall of 2017. Wormser has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Bread Loaf, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. From 2000 to 2006 he served as poet laureate of the state of Maine. He has taught many dozens of workshops across the United States and continues to offer generative workshops along with workshops focusing on the works of a particular poet.

 

Poems-in-the-Windows by Gary Margolis

I wouldn’t choose to be sitting inside
this Sunday afternoon either, on the first day

of real spring. Thinking a few poems would do me
more good than shoveling the last mounds of snow

next to the opera house into a wheelbarrow. A scene
I saw walking around Randolph before the reading.

This place the arts committee named PoemTown
for April’s national poetry month. Inviting citizens

from around our state to submit a poem that could fit
into a window, a driver filling her tank could read.

A teenager trying to buy cigarettes could hesitate,
before going into the convenience store, pondering

what that last line meant. Forgetting the law he was
trying to break. I wish I had more time to read all one

hundred and eight of them. So many windows,
so little time is the title of the poem taped in Aubuchon’s

tinted window. Inside, the shovels and rakes selling faster
than pancakes. I’d be amiss to call anything else.

Here where the sap is flowing and driving over Bethel
Mountain I saw the beginning of flowers splitting

rocks without hesitating, that wouldn’t be caught dead
inside, to adorn a poetry reading.

 

2016 Poets

Pamela Ahlen is currently program coordinator for Bookstock (Woodstock, Vermont), the Green Mountain Literary Festival.  She organizes literary readings for Osher (Lifelong Education at Dartmouth).  Pam received an MFA in creative writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts.  She is the author of the chapbook “Gather Every Little Thing” (Finishing Line Press).

Ina Anderson grew up in England, but has lived in Sharon, VT for many years. She spent her professional life as a technical editor and as a community college educator. Now retired, she has time for her life-long love of poetry and fiber arts. Ina has led poetry groups at the Writers’ Center in White River Junction and at Baxter Library in Sharon. Some of her poems were published in the poetry group anthology, “Perhaps it was the Pie.” Her first collection, Before I Left, will be published by this fall.

Danny Dover lives with his wife Mary in a remodeled schoolhouse in Bethel. He received his B.A. from Antioch College in 1971 and also holds Associate Degrees in Surveying Technology and Keyboard Technology. Danny was the piano technician at Dartmouth College for seventeen years and continues servicing pianos part-time. Previously he worked as a folksinger, contradance musician, dulcimer maker, foundry patternmaker, and surveyor. Danny serves on the Board of Hands in Outreach, Inc., a small non-profit coordinating educational sponsorships for very poor children in Nepal. His poems have appeared in Blueline and numerous issues of Bloodroot Literary Magazine. He has published one chapbook, Kindness Soup, Thankful Tea (Dhotarap Press, 2006). Danny was a 2013 Pushcart nominee. His first full-length book of poetry, “Tasting Precious Metal,” was recently published by Antrim House Books.

Chard deNiord is Vermont’s newly-appointed Poet Laureate. Born in New Haven, CT and raised in Lynchburg, VA, he anticipated going into the medical profession until college professors introduced him to religious studies. After graduating from Lynchburg College, deNiord earned his MDiv from Yale Divinity School. Before pursuing ordination, he working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Five years later, he left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1990, he published his first collection, “Asleep in the Fire” (University of Alabama Press), while teaching comparative religions and philosophy at the Putney School.

In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine and Ellen Bryant Voigt. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007.

In addition to several collections of poetry, he has authored a book of essays and interviews with renowned poets. He is currently a professor of English at Providence College. He lives in Westminster West with his wife, Liz.

Dick Drysdale grew up in Randolph and succeeded his father as editor and publisher of Randolph’s weekly newspaper, then the White River Valley Herald, in 1971, when he was 26. He sold the paper in June 2015, when he was rather older. Dick’s written output has mostly been newspaper stories and editorials, some of which have received statewide attention and he was inducted into the New England Press Association’s Hall of Fame a year ago. He has enjoyed writing poetry but hasn’t written much of it. He insists that he experienced a Fertile Period for about 15 months some 20 years ago and has been mired in a Fallow Period ever since. A few of his poems have been published in literary journals and 15 in his own book “Vermont Moments” published late last year.

Jamie Gage is a Vermonter, father and husband, poet and writer who has won fellowships to the Vermont Studio Center and Vermont Arts Council. His work has been published in dozens of periodicals and literary journals including Main Street Rag, Inkwell, Out of Line, Mountain Gazette, Powhatan Review, and others. His first book of poems “True If Destroyed” is now available from Finishing Line Press or by contacting him at jgagenow@gmail.com.

Aaron Marcus (piano, concertina, banjo, foot percussion, vocals) draws on a rich background of musical traditions including New England contra, classical piano, English country dance, West African, and old time. Aaron is well known throughout the Northeast for his performances with Giant Robot Dance, Gift of the Marcii, Frost and Fire, and The Turning Stile. In his non-musical life, he works as an endangered-species biologist.

Gary Margolis is the author of four books of poems. His poems speak from the heart of New England and our nation and speak across cultures. They’re characterized by thoughtful emotion, humor, curiosity and surprise. He is the Executive Director Emeritus of College Mental Health Services at Middlebury College where he was also a part-time Associate Professor of English and American Literatures. He is a recipient of Vermont Arts Council and Millay Colony Awards and a Robert Frost Fellow at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. His poems and essays have appeared in Poetry, American Scholar, Poetry Northwest, and the Journal of the American College Health Association.

Lizzy Mandell is a Vermont singer/songwriter. Her album debut, Made for Flying, showcases eleven original songs. Lizzy’s soulful voice and compelling lyrics and melodies take the listener on a ride through the American landscape – through mountain farms, desert towns, to ocean shores, and home again.

Dorothy Robson is a founder of the White River Valley Players. The Hancock musician has composed and performed music for a number of WRVP Productions, including The Cherry Orchard, Second Chance, and most recently, Ransom, which was performed at Chandler in November 2014.

Gwyneth Walker’s music has been widely performed throughout the country and is beloved by performers and audiences alike for its energy, beauty, reverence, drama, and humor. Dr. Gwyneth Walker is a graduate of Brown University and the Hartt School of Music. She holds B.A., M.M. and D.M.A. degrees in Music Composition. A former faculty member of the Oberlin College Conservatory, she resigned from academic employment in 1982 in order to pursue a career as a full-time composer. For nearly 30 years, she lived on a dairy farm in Braintree. She now divides her time between her childhood hometown of New Canaan, Connecticut and the musical communities of Sarasota, Florida and Randolph, Vermont. Walker’s catalogue includes over 300 commissioned works for orchestra, chamber ensembles, chorus, and solo voice. A special interest has been dramatic works that combine music with readings, acting, and movement.

Chloe Viner has been writing poetry for fifteen years. Her first book of poetry “Naked Under an Umbrella” was published by Finishing Line press in 2011. Her second book of poetry, “What the Rain Said Last Night” was published in 2015 by Future Cycle Press. Her third book of poetry, “27 Apples” is forthcoming this July. Chloe lives in a large farmhouse in rural Vermont with her husband, cat, dog and a flock of hens. Chloe works as the Panel Manager at Franklin Grand Isle Restorative Justice Center and spends her spare time reading and hiking.